Chamomilla (chamomile)

This is an annual flowering plant called German chamomile, belonging to the Asteraceae family, and is widespread all over Europe. As an herb, it is used in teas to calm digestive cramps and relieve sleeplessness.

Homeopathic uses: Colic, teething difficulties or toothache, diarrhea, and painful menses (periods)*

Fresh red onions

Homeopathic use: Acute symptoms of the common cold*

Allium cepa (onion)

Arnica chamissonis (American arnica)

Arnica montana is a perennial with bright, yellow daisy-like flowers that appears in July and August. It is found in the hills and mountains of northern and central Europe and Siberia. Note that the garden displays Arnica chamissonis, which is easier to cultivate in the U.S.

Homeopathic uses: Muscle aches, joint pains and bruises*

Calendula officinalis (garden marigold)

Calendula is a native to Southern Europe and cultivated widely throughout North America. This flower has bright yellow-orange blossoms.

Homeopathic uses: Scrapes, burns and skin irritations*

Passiflora incarnata is a common perennial wildflower with a vine that climbs and grows rapidly. It can be found in the southern U.S. It is still used in herbal teas as a mild sedative.

Homeopathic use: Insomnia owing to mental fatigue*

Passiflora incarnata (passionflower)

St. John’s wort is native to Europe but is commonly found in the U.S. and Canada in the dry ground of roadsides, meadows, and woods. As an herb, it is used to relieve mild depression, but must be used with precautions with other drugs or supplements.

Homeopathic use: Acute nerve pain*

Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort)

Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh)

Plumes of tiny, star-like white flowers tower up to 8 feet tall over fern-like, dark-green foliage. This is a native to the eastern U.S. Black cohosh is still used in many conditions affecting women, but interacts with other drugs, and might not be safe at higher doses.

Homeopathic uses: Menopause symptoms including hot flashes/flushes, irritability, mood swings and sleep disturbances*

This perennial plant is a member of the Ranunculaceae or buttercup family. It grows in clumps on sandy well-drained soil in sunny meadows, pastures, and fields.

Homeopathic use: Colds with thick yellow discharge*

Pulsatilla (wind flower)

The common Rue, known as Herb-of-Grace, is an herb with bright yellow flowers and is native to southern Europe. It was used for many conditions but is now considered too toxic in herb form.

Homeopathic uses: Eyestrain, sprains, varicose veins and rheumatism*

Ruta gravolens (rue)

Symphytum officinale, known as comfrey or knitbone, is a common perennial herb that grows wild in parts of the U.S. and is cultivated in much of the world. As an herb, it is not used anymore because of its liver toxicity.

Homeopathic uses: Bone fractures and bone pains*

Symphytum officinale (comfrey)

See the Plants

Welcome to

The Boiron Medicinal Garden

at Rodale Institute

The Boiron Medicinal Garden, in partnership with the Rodale Institute, was founded in 2015 as an educational showcase for flowers and herbs used in manufacturing homeopathic medicines. Open to the public year-round, it is located at the institute’s multipurpose 386-acre farm in Kutztown, Pa.
 
The medicinal garden features Arnica chamissonis (American arnica), Calendula officinalis (garden marigold), Chamomilla (chamomile), Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort), Ruta gravolens (rue), Symphytum officinale (comfrey) and many other therapeutic plants found in some of 
Boiron’s most popular medicines.

CLICK HERE to download the garden guidebook

Planting is ongoing and dependent on seasonal availability

Upcoming Events at the Garden

SEPT.

9

Organic Stewardship Awards

Saturday, September 9, 2023

ABOUT RODALE INSTITUTE

© 2023 Boiron, Inc. All rights reserved | Terms and conditionsPrivacy policy

*Claims based on traditional homeopathic practice, not accepted medical evidence. Not FDA evaluated.

*Claims based on traditional homeopathic practice, not accepted medical evidence. Not FDA evaluated.

© 2023 Boiron, Inc. All rights reserved | Terms and conditionsPrivacy policy

ABOUT BOIRON

ABOUT HOMEOPATHY

More than 90 years ago in Lyon, France, twin brothers and pharmacists Jean and Henri Boiron set out to develop a way to prepare reliable homeopathic medicines for their patients. Today, as world leader in homeopathic medicines, Boiron continues as an independent pharmaceutical laboratory that prides itself on quality manufacturing and responsible environmental practices. It’s still operated by the Boiron family who continue to be passionate about integrating the benefits of homeopathic medicine into daily life. Learn more at BoironUSA.com.

Homeopathy is a therapeutic method that uses highly diluted natural substances such as plants and flowers to relieve a variety of symptoms. Used to treat many acute health conditions, these medicines do not cause drowsiness or interact with other medications. To learn more about homeopathy, visit Boiron’s Online Education Center.

Rodale Institute is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to growing the regenerative organic agriculture movement through rigorous research, farmer training, and education. Their groundbreaking science and direct farmer-support programs serve as a catalyst for change in farming and food production worldwide. Over a 75-year history, Rodale Institute has proven that organic farming is not only viable, but essential to humanity’s survival.

Welcome to

The Boiron Medicinal Garden

at Rodale Institute

See the Plants

Passiflora incarnata (passionflower)

Passiflora incarnata is a common perennial wildflower with a vine that climbs and grows rapidly. It can be found in the southern U.S. It is still used in herbal teas as a mild sedative.

Homeopathic use: Insomnia owing to mental fatigue*  

St. John’s wort is native to Europe but is commonly found in the U.S. and Canada in the dry ground of roadsides, meadows, and woods. As an herb, it is used to relieve mild depression, but must be used with precautions with other drugs or supplements.

Homeopathic use: Acute nerve pain*

Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort)

Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh)

Plumes of tiny, star-like white flowers tower up to 8 feet tall over fern-like, dark-green foliage. This is a native to the eastern U.S. Black cohosh is still used in many conditions affecting women, but interacts with other drugs, and might not be safe at higher doses.

Homeopathic uses: Menopause symptoms including hot flashes/flushes, irritability, mood swings and sleep disturbances*

Calendula is a native to Southern Europe and cultivated widely throughout North America. This flower has bright yellow-orange blossoms.

Homeopathic uses: Scrapes, burns and skin irritations*

Calendula officinalis (garden marigold)

Chamomilla (chamomile)

This is an annual flowering plant called German chamomile, belonging to the Asteraceae family, and is widespread all over Europe. As an herb, it is used in teas to calm digestive cramps and relieve sleeplessness.

Homeopathic uses: Colic, teething difficulties or toothache, diarrhea, and painful menses (periods)*

Allium cepa (onion)

Fresh red onions

Homeopathic use: Acute symptoms of the common cold*

Arnica chamissonis (American arnica)

Arnica montana is a perennial with bright, yellow daisy-like flowers that appears in July and August. It is found in the hills and mountains of northern and central Europe and Siberia. Note that the garden displays Arnica chamissonis, which is easier to cultivate in the U.S.

Homeopathic uses: Muscle aches, joint pains and bruises*

This perennial plant is a member of the Ranunculaceae or buttercup family. It grows in clumps on sandy well-drained soil in sunny meadows, pastures, and fields.

Homeopathic use: Colds with thick yellow discharge*

Pulsatilla (wind flower)

The common Rue, known as Herb-of-Grace, is an herb with bright yellow flowers and is native to southern Europe. It was used for many conditions but is now considered too toxic in herb form.

Homeopathic uses: Eyestrain, sprains, varicose veins and rheumatism*

Ruta gravolens (rue)

Symphytum officinale, known as comfrey or knitbone, is a common perennial herb that grows wild in parts of the U.S. and is cultivated in much of the world. As an herb, it is not used anymore because of its liver toxicity.

Homeopathic uses: Bone fractures and bone pains*  

Symphytum officinale (comfrey)

CLICK HERE to download the garden guidebook

Planting is ongoing and dependent on seasonal availability

View the Garden

Register Now

View the Garden

Grow Your Own Garden

Interested in starting or enhancing your garden? Learn from the experts at Rodale Institute on everything from organic composting to pest control, weeding, and more.

Keeping Pests Out

Watering 101

Weeds

5 Composting Tips

Why Compost

Grow Your Own Garden

Interested in starting or enhancing your garden? Learn from the experts at Rodale Institute on everything from organic composting to pest control, weeding, and more.

Keeping Pests Out

Watering 101

Weeds

5 Composting Tips

Why Compost